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California Cheese Trail

 

Ranching in the Seashore

Because the continuation of sustainable agriculture on Point Reyes National Seashore (Seashore) and Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) directly affects our mission to permanently protect Marin’s agricultural land for agricultural use, MALT unequivocally supports the continuation of sustainable farming and ranching in these areas. Together, they represent nearly a fifth of Marin County’s agricultural acreage and production. If these agricultural operations disappear, we face losing the critical mass necessary to sustain suppliers, processors and other services crucial to the future of agriculture countywide. The Seashore’s ranches also represent a significant portion of the county’s managed coastal grasslands, which through cattle grazing provide habitat for endangered species, sequester carbon, store water, support pollinators, reduce wildfire danger and keep invasive plant species in check.

Updated November 2017

After a lawsuit filed last year, the National Park Services (NPS) came to a settlement agreement with the plaintiffs on July 14, 2017, which requires that the Seashore’s General Management Plan (GMP) be amended by July 14, 2021, and that during that time five-year leases would be granted to the ranchers. As part of this process, the NPS has initiated a public comment period on a conceptual range of management alternatives where the public is encouraged to share their observations, concerns and ideas by November 15, 2017*. Once the conceptual range of alternatives has been refined with public input, the second phase of planning will begin, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the GMP amendment.

*UPDATE: The public comment period was extended to November 22, 2017. 

Submit your public comment to the NPS by November 15!The following six alternatives are currently being considered:

  • No Ranching and Limited Management of Tule Elk
  • No Dairy Ranching and Management of Drakes Beach Tule Elk Herd
  • Reduced Ranching and Management of the Drakes Beach Tule Elk Herd
  • Continued Ranching and Management of the Drakes Beach Tule Elk Herd (NPS Initial Proposal)
  • Continued Ranching and Removal of the Drakes Beach Tule Elk Herd
  • Continue Current Management (No Action)

MALT supports a GMP that provides for ongoing sustainable agriculture in the Seashore and GGNRA.

For more information about the GMP Amendment process, read the NPS Newsletter.
Public comments can be submitted electronically to the NPS at: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/POREGMPA.

FAQs

What is sustainable agriculture?
What are the six management alternatives being considered for public input?
What was the lawsuit about?
What are the requirements of the settlement?
How were the ranches originally incorporated into the park when Point Reyes National Seashore was created?
What is a General Management Plan Amendment?
Does Marin County support ranching in the Seashore?
What are the economic benefits of sustainable ranching in the Seashore?
What are the environmental benefits of sustainable ranching in the Seashore?
How can I support the ranchers?

What is sustainable agriculture?

When we talk about sustainability, we mean more than organic or pasture-raised. Sustainable agriculture conserves natural resources, is profitable over the long term and benefits the local community. To learn more, go to http://asi.ucdavis.edu/programs/sarep/about/what-is-sustainable-agriculture/#concept-themes.

In many regions, environmental conservation and successful farming and ranching are at odds, but here in Marin County they go hand in hand. To learn how MALT helps our landowners steward their land in ways that protect water quality, improve soil health, sequester carbon and allow plants and animals to thrive, go here http://www.malt.org/protected-lands/stewardship.

What are the six management alternatives being considered for public input?

The following six alternatives are currently being considered:

  • No Ranching and Limited Management of Tule Elk
  • No Dairy Ranching and Management of Drakes Beach Tule Elk Herd
  • Reduced Ranching and Management of the Drakes Beach Tule Elk Herd
  • Continued Ranching and Management of the Drakes Beach Tule Elk Herd (NPS Initial Proposal)
  • Continued Ranching and Removal of the Drakes Beach Tule Elk Herd
  • Continue Current Management (No Action)

What WAS the lawsuit about?

In February 2016 the Center for Biological Diversity, the Resource Renewal Institute and the Western Watershed Project filed suit against the National Park Service and Point Reyes National Seashore Superintendent Cicely Muldoon over the Seashore’s preparation of the Ranch Comprehensive Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (Ranch CMP) and the alleged absence of environmental review of one-year leases or “letters of authorization.”

The suit argued that National Park Service policies call for phasing out all commercial grazing, only allowing it in specific situations that do not cause “unacceptable impacts.” The groups maintained that the ranch planning process currently underway has unjustifiably taken precedence over an update to the 35-year-old General Management Plan for the Seashore, and attempted to block the Park Service from renewing long-term leases with the ranchers now working the land.

After the lawsuit was filed, Marin County as well as the ranchers in the Seashore successfully intervened on the side of Seashore Superintendent Cicely Muldoon and the National Park Service. Separately, the judge in the case denied the Park Service’s request to dismiss the suit. The plaintiffs asked the court to prevent the Park Service from working on the Ranch Management Plan process and issuing long-term leases to the ranches. 

During the development of the Ranch CMP, 18 of the 24 ranching families in the park did not have current leases but instead operated under one-year letters of authorization, which the Seashore had stated it would issue until the ranch plan is finished. In July 2017, a settlement was reached allowing the Park Service to issue leases or permits to ranchers for terms not to exceed five years from the date the agreement is approved.

What are the requirements of the settlement?

The July 2017 settlement requires the NPS to prepare a General Management Plan (GMP) Amendment and environmental impact statement that provides management guidance for approximately 28,000 acres in Point Reyes National Seashore and the north district of Golden Gate National Recreation Area, including all lands currently leased for ranching, and complete them by July 2021.

The settlement requires the NPS to evaluate a no-ranching alternative. The NPS will also consider management strategies or actions that include agricultural diversification, increased operational flexibility, the promotion of sustainable operational practices, and succession planning.

The agreement allows the Park Service to issue leases or permits to ranchers for terms not to exceed five years from the date the agreement is approved. These interim leases provide greater certainty to ranchers than the 1-year authorizations the Park Service issued during the Ranch Comprehensive Management Plan process.

How were the ranches originally incorporated into the park when Point Reyes National Seashore was created?

If it weren’t for the ranchers there would be no Point Reyes National Seashore. Ranchers formed a strong coalition with environmental organizations to protect the land from development in order to pass the original 1962 legislation that established the park.

When the National Seashore was first established, the pastoral zone was identified as an island of privately owned ranchland, within which properties of 500 acres or more could not be condemned. Under the original legislation, this island of ranches would have remained in private ownership if owners chose to continue ranching and opted not to sell, as a majority of them did.

However, in 1970 Public Law 91-223 was enacted, increasing the Seashore’s land acquisition budget and also allowing condemnation of the privately owned pastoral zone lands. The threat of possible future condemnation led all of the remaining ranch families within the pastoral zone to sell their land to the federal government, though most of them continued ranching under 20- to 25-year government agreements.

Additional history of the Seashore is detailed in a 2009 report, “The Changing Role of Agriculture in Point Reyes National Seashore,” produced by University of California Cooperative Extension, Marin County.

What is a General Management Plan Amendment?

In lieu of the Ranch Comprehensive Management Plan that NPS had been preparing, under the settlement the parties agreed that NPS shall prepare a GMP Amendment and an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that, at a minimum, addresses the lands currently leased for ranching in Point Reyes and in the north district of Golden Gate National Recreation Area. The GMP and EIS will be combined in a single document. The GMP will evaluate the impact of continued ranching and evaluate a no ranching alternative, a reduced ranching alternative, and a no-dairy ranching alternative. The continued ranching alternative will evaluate strategies for ranch and elk management. 

Does Marin County support ranching in the Seashore?

Absolutely. Marin County was critical to saving West Marin from development in the 1960s when it adopted A60 zoning for agricultural land. The County has been a longtime partner with MALT in further protecting working farms and ranches for permanent agricultural use.

The current situation with the ranches in the Seashore is no exception. In April 2016, the Marin County Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to intervene in the suit, asking to join the National Park Service as a co-defendant. As Supervisor Steve Kinsey told the Point Reyes Light, there is “broad, diverse interest in our county to see that ranching in the park can continue for generations to come, and that the requirements to be able to do so are fair and economically viable for the ranching families whose livelihood depends upon that.”

What are the economic benefits of sustainable ranching in the Seashore?

Together, farm and ranch operations in the Seashore and GGNRA represent nearly a fifth of Marin County’s agricultural land base as well as production. If these ranches disappear, we face losing the critical mass necessary to sustain suppliers, processors and other services crucial to the future of agriculture countywide.

With the Seashore's ranches would go much of our local organic milk, grass-fed beef and artisan cheeses. The broader threat of lost agricultural services throughout the county would further threaten the availability of locally-produced food for consumers.

What are the environmental benefits of sustainable ranching in the Seashore?

Seashore ranches represent a significant portion of the county's managed coastal grasslands, which provide vital environmental benefits for the region.

In particular, historic grazing in Point Reyes National Seashore and elsewhere—first by native grazers and more recently by livestock—has been shown to help maintain grassland habitat and conserve native plant and animal species.

Other examples of environmental benefits of sustainable ranching include:

  • Reduced wildfire threat from rangeland fires
  • Soil carbon sequestration
  • Increased soil water retention
  • Maintenance and provision of habitat for endangered species

For more information about the ecological benefits of grazing, visit the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition; University of California Cooperative Extension, Marin County; and California Country magazine.

How can I support the ranchers?

Submit a public comment to the NPS by November 15, 2017 supporting the continuation of sustainable agriculture in the Seashore and GGNRA.

Next, share this link on social media: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/POREGMPA, reminding your friends and networks of the November 15 deadline.

Another way to help is to buy local. Organic milk and grass-fed beef are the primary products of Seashore ranches, but buying local food is good for farmers and ranchers throughout Marin County. In fact, many Seashore ranching families also work on private land, some protected by MALT and some not. Talk to the producers at local farmers markets and voice your support.

For more information about how you can support the ranchers in the Seashore, contact the Point Reyes Seashore Ranchers Association.